Act III: The Result

Act III is the outcome of your novel and should take up roughly, 25-10% of the novel. To close the category on how to write the beginning of your novel I am going to outline the structure that each act in a novel should have. The source that I used to gather this information is…

Act II: The Clash

Act II of your novel, otherwise known as the middle of your novel, should make up roughly 50-65% of your novel. To close the category on how to write the beginning of your novel I am going to outline the structure that each act in a novel should have. The source that I used to…

Act I: The Foundation

Act I of your story is the base that you will construct everything from. To close the category on how to write the beginning of your novel I am going to outline the structure that each act in a novel should have. The source that I used to gather this information is Joseph Bates’s book The…

The Positive Change Arc

Now that we are wrapping up the steps you’ll need to take when planning, crafting, and writing the beginning of your novel let’s get into the details of the positive change character arc. There is more than one type of character arc that your protagonist can follow (as in the negative change arc and the…

In Pursuit of Believing

This is something that can get tricky. If you’re writing a fantasy novel of some kind then you are probably going to have to create an ideology for a group of people, animals, or things. In my case, writing about a society of meerkats, I had to think about what these creatures believe. I asked…

Conflict In Real Life (Well, Real Enough)

What generated more conflict in “The Lion King”, Scar or Simba’s guilt? Answer: Neither. They both contribute to Simba’s overall conflict. Why? In Disney’s “The Lion King” (spoiler alert!) Simba blames himself for his fathers death, when really it was the antagonist of the movie, Simba’s uncle Scar, who was responsible. Throughout the movie Simba…

POV

Now, it’s time to think about the point of view (POV) that your novel will be told from. There are four POVs that your novel could be told from: first person, second person, third person limited, and third person omniscient. First person POV is when the story is told directly from the main character’s perspective…

Themes Just Happen

Next up, is identifying the theme of your novel. Most likely you’ll be able to apply a universal them to your novel, something that is a widely known and easily relatable. Examples of these themes are: coming of age, unrequited love, sacrifice, good triumphs over evil, money doesn’t equate to happiness, and so on. The…

Sensible Settings

The setting is the physical place where your story will be taking place. If you are writing about a setting that you are unfamiliar with then research it. The setting of my series is the desert. Having never been to a desert before I had to research what the Kalahari Desert is like and the…

I Like Your Tone

Tone and voice are two separate literary elements but for the purpose of saving time I’m defining and explaining both in the same post. Tone is regarded as the attitude of the writer toward a subject or audience. The manor in which the writer approaches the common theme or subject matter is the tone. Tone…